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RESEARCH OVERVIEW

We are interested in the cancer microenvironment or tumour stroma which consists of various cell types, including immune cells and blood vessels, and supports cancer growth. Our research program aims to understand how stromal cells are remodelled, and the extent to which stromal networks regulate cancer progression. We have shown that the tumour microenvironment is highly dynamic and can be re-programmed or remodelled to enhance immune cell uptake and overall response to immunotherapy. Furthermore, we have developed precision tools to specifically target abnormal stromal features to disrupt and re-program signalling networks between multiple stromal components and to break the vicious cycle of disease progression and relapse.

Utilising a suite of preclinical cancer models which includes genetically modified mouse models of pancreatic cancers, orthotopic cancer models of breast, lung, brain and melanoma, and human cancer specimens our goal is to develop new drugs that can increase the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients.

Professor Ruth Ganss

Professor Ruth Ganss

Scientific Head, Cancer and cell biology division

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LATEST NEWS

New way to detect breast cancer more accurately

A team of researchers from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and The University of Western Australia have developed a new way to more accurately detect breast cancer in patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery. The study, published today in Cancer Research, will significantly impact the way surgeons are able to…

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New drug limits cancer spreading

Most patients die from metastatic cancers, not the primary tumour A research team that recently invented a drug to stop blood vessels from forming a treatment resistant barrier around some cancers has now discovered the drug can be used to prevent the cancer from spreading. “We originally developed the drug…

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Smartphones the next frontier in skin cancer detection

Artificial intelligence could soon be used to diagnose melanoma more cheaply and accurately based on an artificial intelligence algorithm developed by WA researchers. Findings published in the journal of the American Medical Association (AMA), led by an international team of researchers from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and…

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