ACRF Cancer Imaging Facility


Cutting edge technology comes together at the Perkins

ACRF

 CIF equipment

In 2011 the Australian Cancer Research Foundation awarded a $2.4 million grant to the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research to purchase vital imaging equipment, allowing scientists to assess tumours and determine effective forms of treatment.

This imaging equipment is essential in the fight against cancer, helping experts in the field move towards earlier disease detection, prevention strategies and assessment of the efficacy of new cancer treatments.

As a state facility, the equipment is available to researchers from all over Western Australia.

To find out more about the Australian Cancer Research Foundation, please visit www.acrf.com.au

You will need login access for more detailed information about the facility and to make a booking. 
To apply for access to the facility, please contact the facility manager.


Media

Perkins welcomes new imaging expert

Radiologist and nuclear medicine specialist, Dr Liesl Celliers, has been appointed in a new position which aims to fast-track cancer research at the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research.

High tech boost for WA Cancer Researchers

A $2.4 million grant awarded to the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research to purchase vital imaging equipment, which will allow scientists to assess tumours and determine effective forms of treatment. Read more.

Peter Klinken's ABC: PET scanner

Peter Klinken has spoken publicly about the exciting news that the Institute has received a $2.4 million grant from the Australian Cancer Research Foundation, which will be used for a PET scanner to provide images of developing tumours in pre-clinical models. Read more.

Major cancer research boost

Western Australia's best scientists have been given a major boost in their fight against cancer, with the announcement of $2.4 million in grants from the Australian Cancer Research Foundation (ACRF). Read more.


Frequently Asked Questions

    1. Where did the grant come from?
    2. Why did the Perkins apply for funding for a integrated preclinical Cancer Imaging Facility in WA?
    3. How can pre-clinical imaging help researchers find treatments for cancer in humans?
    4. Would the Perkins be able to achieve these outcomes without the support of the ACRF?
    5. What will this grant mean for cancer patients?
    6. Will the new facility be limited to Perkins staff?
    7. What impact is ACRF is having on cancer research in Australia?
    8. How important is cancer research?

 

1. Where did the grant come from? 

This $2.4 million grant honours the memory of the late Mr Kevin McCusker who made a generous donation to the Australian Cancer Research Foundation through his Will. Mr McCusker was a quiet and unassuming man of strong principles and deep feelings and his family told the ACRF he made this bequest because people he loved had died from cancer. Mr McCusker's donation will be used to help fund a state-of-the-art preclinical imaging facility to maximise WA's capacity to promote innovation in cancer research.

2. Why did the Perkins apply for funding for a integrated preclinical Cancer Imaging Facility in WA? 

To expand its preclinical and clinical cancer research program in WA, the Perkins sought an ACRF grant to establish the ACRF Cancer Imaging Facility and to equip the facility with a state-of-the-art preclinical imaging suite and cutting edge optical imaging endomicroscopes. In particular, this application sought to significantly expand the cancer imaging capability in WA with the addition of a microMagnetic Resonance Imaging scanner (microMRI), a hybrid microPositron Emission Tomography/X-ray Computed Tomography scanner (microPET/CT), a hybrid Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/CT scanner (microSPECT/CT), together with additional cutting-edge confocal fluorescent imaging equipment which will be further developed by CMCA.

3. How can pre-clinical imaging help researchers find treatments for cancer in humans? 

Imaging for cancer management and diagnosis in humans is fundamental. Equally, in preclinical models of cancer, it's a central part of cancer research. The micro- scanners will allow Perkins researchers to image cancer progression in a range of well developed preclinical models like never before, enabling them to monitor for the first time tumour development, angiogenesis, metastasis and response to novel therapeutics.

4. Would the Perkins be able to achieve these outcomes without the support of the ACRF? 

No. These are very expensive items of equipment, and this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. Other grants don't come near this. There is no other source of funding in Australia that offers grants for infrastructure and equipment for cancer research like the ACRF.

5. What will this grant mean for cancer patients? 

It will mean that, for the first time in WA, researchers will be able to subject preclinical models of cancer to more intensive scrutiny and imaging and thereby speed up progression of new therapeutic advances with cancer. Preclinical models are essential for Perkins researchers to trial new drugs and new ways of treating cancer. It will have a profound effect.

6. Will the new facility be limited to Perkins staff? 

The ACRF Cancer Imaging Facility is a state facility and the imaging equipment is available to all WA experts in their fields . There are currently no micro- MRI, PET/CT or SPECT/CT scanners in Western Australia, so this facility drastically expands the range of analyses available in preclinical models of cancer.

7. What impact is ACRF is having on cancer research in Australia? 

ACRF is absolutely essential. ACRF is filling a gap that no other organisation fills, which is core infrastructure. Core infrastructure is both 'bricks and mortar', as well as core, large cutting-edge pieces of equipment that are remarkably difficult to get in any other way. The ACRF stands alone in this country. There is no other foundation that provides any large infrastructure.

8. How important is cancer research? 

Cancer is the leading cause of death in Australia with over 39,800 deaths each year, in spite of a 30 percent improvement in survival over the last two decades. One in 3 Australian men and 1 in 4 Australian women will be directly affected by cancer before the age of 75. Cancer does not discriminate. It can, and does, affect people of all ages. Perkins researchers are dedicated to their vision of a healthier future for humans across the globe and generous grants such as this funding from ACRF are hugely appreciated.

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