Associate Professor Kevin Pfleger, MA(Cambridge) PhD(Edinburgh)


Kevin PflegerLaboratory Head, Molecular Endocrinology and Pharmacology
E:  kevin.pfleger@perkins.uwa.edu.au
T:  +61 8 6151 0734

Profile
Associate Professor Kevin Pfleger is a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) RD Wright Biomedical Research Fellow (Level 2), Head of Molecular Endocrinology and Pharmacology at the Perkins and Chief Scientific Advisor of Dimerix Bioscience, a spin-out company from the Perkins and The University of Western Australia.  He was awarded his MA and PhD from Cambridge and Edinburgh Universities respectively, and relocated to Western Australia in October 2002. He was a NHMRC Peter Doherty Research Fellow from 2005 to 2008 and an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow from 2011 to 2014. He was named Western Australian Young Scientist of the Year 2009 and his work featured as one of the NHMRC 10 of the Best Research Projects 2010. In 2011, he was awarded the Australian Museum Eureka Prize for Emerging Leader in Science, in 2012 he won The Endocrine Society Early Investigators Award and the WA Young Tall Poppy Science Award, for 2014 he won the Endocrine Society of Australia's Mid-Career Research Award and an NHMRC Research Excellence Award for the top ranked fellowship application in his category, and in 2015 he was awarded the UWA Vice Chancellor's Mid-Career Research Award. Most recently, Associate Professor Pfleger has been honoured with the 2016 Novartis Prize of the British Pharmacological Society, and he is currently Chair of the Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists (ASCEPT) Scientific Advisory Committee.

Eureka Prize winner Kevin Pfleger tells The Australian's Stephen Matchett about his scientific quest - watch the interview below.

Research overview

  • G-protein coupled receptor pharmacology.
  • Interactions between G-protein coupled receptors and arrestins.
  • Receptor heteromerization.
  • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET).


Research projects

  • Angiotensin receptor complexes and their role in kidney and cardiovascular disease.
  • Mutations of vasopressin receptor 2 resulting in kidney disorders.
  • Chemokine receptor complexes relevant to cancer and prostate disorders.
  • Receptor tyrosine kinase complexes relevant to cancer.
  • Orexin receptor-arrestin-ubiquitin complexes.
  • Advanced resonance energy transfer technology development.


Selected publications

  1. * Tiulpakov A, White CW, Abhayawardana RS, See HB, Chan AS, Seeber RM, Heng JI, Dedov I, Pavlos NJ, Pfleger KDG (2016) Mutations of vasopressin receptor 2 including novel L312S have differential effects on trafficking. Mol Endocrinol 30: 889-904. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  2. Gomes I, Ayoub MA, Fujita W, Jaeger WC, Pfleger KDG and Devi LA (2016) G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers. Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 56: 403-425. [Click here to download]

  3. * Stoddart LA, Johnstone EKM, Wheal AJ, Goulding J, Robers MB, Machleidt T, Wood KV, Hill SJ and Pfleger KDG (2015) Application of BRET to monitor ligand binding to GPCRs. Nat Methods 12: 661-663. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  4. * Ayoub MA, Zhang Y, Kelly RS, See HB, Johnstone EKM, McCall EA, Williams JH, Kelly DJ and Pfleger KDG (2015) Functional Interaction between Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 and Chemokine (C-C Motif) Receptor 2 with Implications for Chronic Kidney Disease. PLoS ONE 10: e0119803. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  5. * Jaeger WC, Seeber RM, Eidne KA and Pfleger KDG (2014) Molecular determinants of orexin receptor-arrestin-ubiquitin complex formation. Br J Pharmacol 171: 364-374. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  6. * Armstrong SP, Seeber RM, Ayoub MA, Feldman BJ and Pfleger KDG (2013) Characterization of three Vasopressin Receptor 2 variants: an apparent polymorphism (V266A) and two loss-of-function mutations (R181C and M311V). PLoS ONE 8: e65885. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  7. * Ayoub MA, See HB, Seeber RM, Armstrong SP and Pfleger KDG (2013) Profiling epidermal growth factor receptor and heregulin receptor 3 heteromerization using Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Heteromer Investigation Technology. PLoS ONE 8: e64672. [PLoS One]

  8. * Mustafa S, See HB, Seeber RM, Armstrong SP, White CW, Ventura S, Ayoub MA and Pfleger KDG (2012) Identification and profiling of a novel α1A-adrenoceptor-CXC chemokine receptor 2 heteromer. J Biol Chem 287: 12952-12965. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  9. * Dalrymple MB, Jaeger WC, Eidne KA and Pfleger KDG (2011) Temporal profiling of orexin receptor-arrestin-ubiquitin complexes reveals differences between receptor subtypes. J Biol Chem 286: 16726-16733. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  10. * See HB, Seeber RM, Kocan M, Eidne KA and Pfleger KDG (2011) Application of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromer Identification Technology to monitor β-arrestin recruitment to G protein-coupled receptor heteromers. Assay Drug Dev Technol 9: 21-30. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  11. * Kocan M, Dalrymple MB, Seeber RM, Feldman BJ and Pfleger KDG (2011) Enhanced BRET technology for the monitoring of agonist-induced and agonist-independent interactions between GPCRs and β-arrestins. Front Endocrin 1: 12. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  12. * Ayoub MA and Pfleger KDG (2010) Recent advances in bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technologies to study GPCR heteromerization. Curr Opin Pharmacol 10: 44-52. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  13. * Kocan M, See HB, Sampaio NG, Eidne KA, Feldman BJ and Pfleger KDG (2009) Agonist-independent interactions between β-arrestins and mutant vasopressin type II receptors associated with nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis. Mol Endocrinol 23: 559-571. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  14. Ferré S, Baler R, Bouvier M, Caron MG, Devi LA, Durroux T, Fuxe K, George SR, Javitch JA, Lohse MJ, Mackie K, Milligan G, Pfleger KDG, Pin JP, Volkow N, Waldhoer M, Woods AS and Franco R (2009) Building a new conceptual framework for receptor heteromers. Nat Chem Biol 5: 131-134. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  15. * Kocan M, See HB, Seeber RM, Eidne KA and Pfleger KDG (2008) Demonstration of improvements to the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology for the monitoring of G protein-coupled receptors in live cells. J Biomol Screen 13: 888-898. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  16. * Pfleger KDG, Pawson AJ and Millar RP (2008) Changes to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor extracellular loops differentially affect GnRH analog binding and activation: Evidence for distinct ligand-stabilized receptor conformations. Endocrinology 149: 3118-3129. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  17. * Pfleger KDG, Dromey JR, Dalrymple MB, Lim EML, Thomas WG and Eidne KA (2006) Extended bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (eBRET) for monitoring prolonged protein-protein interactions in live cells. Cell Signal 18: 1664-1670. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  18. * Pfleger KDG, Seeber RM and Eidne KA (2006) Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) for the real-time detection of protein-protein interactions. Nat Protoc 1: 337-345. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  19. * Pfleger KDG and Eidne KA (2006) Illuminating insights into protein-protein interactions using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). Nat Methods 3:165-174. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

  20. * Pfleger KDG and Eidne KA (2005) Monitoring the formation of dynamic G-protein-coupled receptor-protein complexes in living cells. Biochem J 385:625-637. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

* Listed as Corresponding Author

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